terça-feira, 29 de novembro de 2016

 
 A TASTE OF JAPAN - MINI-POSTERS: BIOVEGAN ® IN THE KITCHEN WITH MAIZENA
 
A TASTE OF JAPAN: THE ORIGINAL MINI-POSTERS.

POSTER 03: "BIOVEGAN ® IN THE KITCHEN WITH: MAIZENA*"

The third poster made for the mini-series, when after recommending Maizena* to do the Japanese Tempura mixes we couldn't resist to do a Collage Poster with this classic product, that has been with all of us for several generations and in so many recipes. Yes it is vegan, and also a must-have in the vegan kitchen, specially now that is "that Christmas time" of the year. 

Anyway, who doesn't like vegan bechamel served aside with fresh sauté champignons, spaghetti or mashed potatoes, or just a vegan remake of "papinha maizena"? 

Hope you like it,

BIOVEGAN PORTUGAL ® 2016
The original BIOVEGAN ® Trademarks.

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Maizena in the Web:

www.segredosmaizena.com
(Recipes in portuguese, mostly not vegan, but veganisable)

LD*: Maizena ® and related graphics are registered Trademarks and/or content from Unilever/Jerónimo Martins, Lda

quinta-feira, 24 de novembro de 2016

SABORES VEGANOS DO JAPÃO - Receita vegana de como fazer Kakiage-Sushi ao estilo japonês + 2 receitas para fazer Tempura Mix - Episódio 07 (Parte 2) | 2016-2017 - A TASTE OF JAPAN: as mini-séries originais da BIOVEGAN PORTUGAL ®
 
A TASTE OF JAPAN: THE ORIGINAL MINI-SERIES. 

EPISODE 07 (Part 2):

"JAPANESE STYLE KAKIAGE-SUSHI RECIPE (VEGAN)"

In this episode we present 2 Japanese Vegan batter recipes for Tempura and Kakiage, and a little description of the normal Japanese methods of preparing the batter. 

The episode is based on Master Chef HIROYUKI TERADA video showing how to make a Kakiage Roll or Kakiage Sushi. As Tempura and Kakiage are a staple and a classic in Japanese cuisine, we have noticed that Japanese Chefs normally do not reveal the recipe of the batter, probably because these are signature recipes that distinguishes a restaurant or a Chef.

So in order to get a genuine Japanese batter, we had to go around this and make a resume of several batter recipes. 

Another point to explain here and so that they won't be confused, it's that Kakiage Sushi is not the same that Tempura Sushi, because in the first one the finished Kakiage is placed inside a Sushi-Roll, and becomes a filling, and in the second one (Tempura Sushi) it's an entire Sushi roll that is covered with batter, then goes to deep frying, cools off, and only after it's sliced with already that crispy cover layer. 

Let's go to the recipes then:

JAPANESE STYLE TEMPURA-KAKIAGE BATTERS (VEGAN): 

Composition and how-to-do basic points:

Point 1: the batters are made with liquid and dry ingredients.
Point 2: the liquid ingredients are normally water, or water with ice cubes, and the dry ingredients can be plain flour or a special flour mix for Tempura.
Point 3: the batters are normally made fresh, just before blending and frying. The water used is very cold or freezing-cold, around 3-6º degrees Celsius (37-42º Fahrenheit). This not only retards the batter from immediately starting emulsifying, as it creates a very creamy and very cold batter.
Point 4: before combining the batter and the vegetables, these are always first coated with some flour or with some flour-mix.
Point 5: The oil is to be very hot, for an average frying time of 2-3 minutes per side, until golden brown.

BATTER TYPE 1 (VEGAN):
Flour mix:
125 g plain white flour for:
75 g of corn starch (Maizena's the best)

For approx.:
125 up to 175 g or ml of cold-freezing water 

BATTER TYPE 2 (VEGAN):
Flour mix:
100 g plain white flour for:
25 g of corn starch (Maizena) and
50-75 g of finely ground white rice flour

For approx.:
100 up to 175 g or ml of cold-freezing water 

Preparation tips: 

1) In both flour mixes we can also add 1 tsp baking powder (optional).
2) In the 2 recipes the quantity of water will always depend on the thickness of the batter we want. The best way is to go adding water slowly until finding the right amount. This thickness can also be adjusted to the type of vegetables we use, the water they contain, and the amount of water they expel during frying.
3) Also for the salt and seasonings, they can be added either in the batter or in the vegetables, or both. If using a sauce, the final combination of "salty and sushi tasting" has to be a bit tested and adjusted.

SAUCE PREPARATION / base:

Mirin 1 Tbs
Shoyu 3 Tbs
Sake or Rice Wine 3/4 to 1 Tbs
Water 4-5 Tbs


Optional tastes:

Some seaweed like kombu or other type of seaweed flakes;
Some toasted sesame oil;
Some radish, daikon, umeboshi, wasabi, lemon or lime juice;
Some Teriaky;


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4) To make the final KAKIAGE-SUSHI using any of these 3 vegan TW or JP batters and methods we described, the best way is to watch this second video, and to see how simple and how pretty the final result is. 

Definitely it's an excellent dish for any restaurant's gourmet entrée, or for you to shine as a vegan Chef with your friends.

Hopping you enjoy and have fun,

The original BIOVEGAN ® Trademarks.

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All video and video recipe credits to:

HIROYUKI TERADA - DIARIES OF A MASTER SUSHI CHEF

At Youtube:

sábado, 19 de novembro de 2016

 
BIOVEGAN PORTUGAL ® A TASTE OF JAPAN - THE ORIGINAL MINI-POSTERS: BAMBOO-SUSHI-DESIGN
 
A TASTE OF JAPAN: THE ORIGINAL MINI-POSTERS.

POSTER 02: "BIOVEGAN PORTUGAL® THE BAMBOO-SUSHI-DESIGN"

The second poster made for episode 7 and these mini-series, with a new design idea for better complementing videos and images.

The concept and the name "BAMBOO-SUSHI-DESIGN" just appeared after the first poster was published, when the necessity of having a kind of Japanese design style and graphic composition for better illustrating the make-of of recipes and this type of food has began. 

The initial idea began by making a simple multi-frame like a picture-album that could hold the videos snapshots, but somehow to have also a Japanese identity and that could hold different types of content and utility in these mini-series graphics.

Basically it mixes dry bamboos and the dry bamboo color with fresh green bamboo, together with some characteristic colors from Japan, like the white, red, and dark-green, placed in a way to create a time and ambiance kinda-of Indiana Jones, where Indiana Jones finds a Japanese restaurant in the middle of the jungle with Japanese airplanes passing by, and then he looks for the menu and asks for a vegan sushi with some extras, like a very very fresh "Sake-Laranja". 

Well, it's just the beginning, with new colors, new pixels, and naturally sprinkled with Japanese's culture and design influences.

Hope you enjoy,

BIOVEGAN PORTUGAL ® 2016
The original BIOVEGAN ® Trademarks.

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Poster's original video pictures and Sushi roll making-of full credits to:

Hiroyuki Terada - Diaries of a Master Sushi Chef

segunda-feira, 14 de novembro de 2016

SABORES VEGANOS DO JAPÃO - Receita vegana de como fazer Kakiage-Tempura ao estilo de Taiwan - Episódio 07 (Parte 1) -
2016-2017- A TASTE OF JAPAN: as mini-séries originais da BIOVEGAN PORTUGAL ®
 
A TASTE OF JAPAN: THE ORIGINAL MINI-SERIES. 

EPISODE 07 (Part 1): "TAIWAN STYLE KAKIAGE (VEGAN)"

Kakiage is a type of tempura recipe using fine sliced vegetables added together to a fresh mixed tempura batter, then deep fried till golden. The most common shape is of resembling flat bird nests, and it's normally served simple with a sauce or dips, or together with other dishes like noodles (soba or udon kakiage), sushi (kakiage-sushi), or in a dashi based plate (a soup-style broth eg.like a miso soup).

As making different types of kakiage and tempura has several styles, methods and recipes, we found that these two videos were the more appropriated to give an idea on how to make perfect multi-purpose vegan versions of batter for both kakiage (made with fine slices and shredded vegetables) and tempura (made with whole vegetables, halves & big pieces, slices and chunks). 

As Japanese food culture is widely spread around the world, this first video is based on how kakiage it's made in Taiwan. 

To know a little it about Taiwan, eastern-western Asian History has to go back again 474 years until around 1542, when it was first discovered by the Portuguese in the same period of time of the first arrivals to Japan in 1542-43, and it was then named as the Formosan Islands (Ilhas Formosas). In the following century Taiwan has also been in contact with other different European countries and settlements until Qing, the last dynasty of China (1644 to 1912), annexed the island in the 17th century. Taiwan was later ceded to Japan in 1895 after the Qing dynasty was defeated in he first Sino-Japanese War (1894–1895), and it was allocated as part of Japan from around 1895 until 1945-1952. Nowadays, Taiwan is officially a part of the Republic of China, and is also known as Taipei or Chinese Taipei. 

As to food matters then, Japanese food in Taiwan left its own legacy and traditions, that are now also a part of the daily foods and costumes of Taiwan.

TAIWANESE STYLE TEMPURA-KAKIAGE BATTER (VEGAN), 
BASED ON THE VIDEO FROM TAIWANCOOKING: 

The main difference between the Taiwanese cooking way and the Japanese cooking way is mainly on the use of natural and freezing water to make the batter, and the type of flours used in the mix. Some Brazilian recipes also call for beer, instead of water (1 part beer, 1 part flour). The rest seems to be very similar. 

According to TaiwanCooking the ratio of the batter is 1 rice cup flour (any flour) for 1,5 rice cup water. Since 1 US cup of flour weights approx. 150-160 grams (g) of rice flour; and 1 US cup of water (cup) 235 grams of water (g wt.), then by approximation an eye-measured recipe can be:

150-160 g of flour for:
300-350 g water
And some salt & pepper


The quantity of water will depend on the thickness of the batter we want, the type of vegetables we use, the water they contain, and the amount of water they expel during frying.

PREPARATION: 

Step 1- To make the Sauce / dip:

Base:

Mirin 1 Tbs
Shoyu 3 Tbs
Sake or Rice Wine 3/4 to 1 Tbs
Water 4-5 Tbs


Optional tastes:

Some seaweed like kombu or other type of seaweed flakes;
Some toasted sesame oil;
Some radish, daikon, umeboshi, wasabi, lemon or lime juice;
Some Teriaky;


Step 2- Fine slice or shred in big juliana your favorite vegetables, enough for a medium salad bowl like the video. Ex.: carrots, zucchini, mushrooms, sweet potatoes, broccoli, celery, leeks, spring onions, taro, pumpkin.

Step 3- Important 1: always coat the vegetables with some flour before blending them with the batter.

Step 4- Important 2: make a fresh batter and blend it with the vegetables.

Step 5- Shape, deep fry until gold, remove, absorb extra oil, serve.

Step 6 (optional): prepare a nice and fresh drink, like an orange or a pineapple juice, and enjoy!

     Next on the TASTE: 2 Japanese Vegan batter recipes for T&K and Part 2 of this episode. 

Thanks for watching,

BIOVEGAN PORTUGAL ® 2016
The original BIOVEGAN ® Trademarks.

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All video and recipe credits to: TaiwanCooking 

At Youtube:
 

terça-feira, 8 de novembro de 2016

 
 BIOVEGAN PORTUGAL ® A TASTE OF JAPAN POSTERS: LITTLE-MINI-HOW-TO-T&K

  
A TASTE OF JAPAN: THE ORIGINAL MINI-POSTERS.

POSTER 01: "LITTLE-MINI-HOW-TO-T&K"

As no series is a real series without at least one poster, episodes 6 and 7 of Tempura & Kakiage have this one now, very simple, kinda of a half collage, half poster, half of mini-instructions and half of a mini-flyer.

Vegan batter recipes for T&K are coming soon on the next episode of the TASTE.

'Till then, hope you enjoy,

BIOVEGAN PORTUGAL ® 2016
The original BIOVEGAN ® Trademarks.

quinta-feira, 3 de novembro de 2016

SABORES VEGANOS DO JAPÃO - Como fazer Tempura de vegetais e sushi vegano com tempura - Episódio 6 | 2016-2017 - A TASTE OF JAPAN: as mini-séries originais da BIOVEGAN PORTUGAL ®
  
A TASTE OF JAPAN: THE ORIGINAL MINI-SERIES.

EPISODE 06:

"TEMPURA & KAKIAGE: FUEL FOR THE ROAD"

Prior to finish visiting Nagasaki and to go to Hiroshima, it was time to look for something to eat. Still on the side of the Portuguese legacy on Japan's food there is Tempura, that is now an evolved recipe of the first ones introduced by the Portuguese merchants and Jesuits who initially resided in Nagasaki in the 16th century. 

The word "tempura" comes from the word "tempora", a Latin word meaning "tempo" or "period of time", used by Portuguese and Spanish missionaries to refer to the Lenten period or Ember Days (ad tempora quadragesimae), Fridays, and other Christian holy days. Ember Days or quattuor tempora refer to holy days when Catholics avoid red meat and instead eat fish or vegetables.

There is still today a dish in Portugal very similar to this original version of tempura called "peixinhos da horta", "garden fishes", which consists in long green beans and other vegetables dipped in a mild seasoned batter and fried. The end result is usually chewier than the actual tempura, and the recipe is very similar to the English F&C batter, without the beer and a bit less fluffy.

Earlier to tempura, the Japanese deep-fried food was either simply fried without batter or just fried-coated with rice flour. The original method of making tempura was using a batter consisting of flour, eggs, sugar, salt and sake and it resembled simple fritters. At that time these were eaten without being dipped in any sauce. 

In the 17th century and during the pre-Edo and Edo period (forbiddance of Christianity and closure of Japan to any foreigner-Gaijin contact), tempura and its method underwent a remarkable change as the Yatai culture (food stalls or food kiosks culture) gained more popularity mainly around the Tokyo Bay areas, using only flour, eggs and water as battering ingredients, and the coating was thinner, crispier, and not flavored, which makes the main ingredients flavors to be stronger. 

Today in Japan the mainstream of tempura recipes uses this “Tokyo style or Edo style tempura batter”, which is also used to make Kakiage Tempura (next episode).

Vegetables tempura is called Yasai Tempura. The type of vegetables can include among others: bamboo shoots, bell pepper, butternut squash, carrot, eggplant, gobo (burdock, Arctium lappa), green beans, kabocha, mushrooms, okra, onion, pumpkin, potato, sweet potato, renkon (lotus root), shiitake mushroom and shiso leafs.

BIOVEGAN PORTUGAL ® 2016
The original BIOVEGAN ® Trademarks.

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AN EASY RECIPE TO MAKE
VEGAN SUSHI WITH VEGETABLES TEMPURA :

Adapted from the original recipe from Waitrose:

Ingredients (serves 8)
500g sushi rice
6 tbsp rice wine vinegar
2 tsp caster sugar
1 tsp table salt
1 liter sunflower or vegetable oil
100g cornflour
100g self-raising flour
250ml sparkling water
220g Broccoli Spears, halved lengthwise
1 red pepper, de-seeded and sliced into thin strips
1 courgette, sliced into thin batons
5 salad onions, finely sliced
6 tbsp light soy sauce
To serve
8 sheets sushi nori
4 tbsp Sesame Seeds, toasted

You can see the full recipe at: 


http://www.waitrose.com/home/recipes/recipe_directory/s/sushi-with-tempuravegetables.html
  
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All video and recipe credits to: WAITROSE

At youtube: